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Articles Posted in Community Association

Jeffrey Respler srhl-law.jpgThe firm’s lawsuits alleging major construction defects against the developer, general contractor, architect and engineers behind Miami’s Quantum on the Bay condominium towers were the subject of an article by the Daily Business Review that appeared in the June 16, 2014, edition of the newspaper. The lawsuits allege that the defendants’ work resulted in hundreds of defects, including stucco and HVAC problems as well as inadequate drainage that has led to severe flooding in the community’s fitness center and loading dock.

A 5-2 majority decision by the Florida Supreme Court in the case of Tiara Condominium Association v. Marsh & McLennan limits the legal principle known as the “economic loss rule” only to product liability cases, thereby allowing many claims for breach of contract in the state to be accompanied by tort claims of negligence. The ruling allows the association to proceed with its lawsuit seeking to recover approximately $50 million in damages from its insurance broker, which it claims knew the 42-story oceanfront tower on Singer Island in Palm Beach County was underinsured and failed to tell the association.

3rd district court of appeal.jpgIn December, firm partners Helio De La Torre and Laura M. Manning-Hudson, together with of-counsel attorney H. Hugh McConnell, prevailed in their appeal on behalf of the developer of the 28-story Courvoisier Courts condominium tower on Miami’s Brickell Key before the Third District Court of Appeal. The appellate court found that the lower court erred when it entered a Final Judgment requiring the developer to relinquish to the association all of the parking spaces and storage areas that it assigned to an unsold penthouse prior to turning over control of the property to the association.

Last week in our community association blog I wrote about how a recent decision by a Florida appellate court in the case of Lakeview Reserve Homeowners v. Maronda Homes, Inc. 35 Fla. L. Weekly D2413 (Fla. 5th DCA 2010) has far-reaching implications for homeowners associations in construction defect disputes with developers. In its ruling, the Fifth District Court of Appeal court has broadened the implied warranty of fitness and merchantability granted to purchasers of new homes to include structures in common areas of a subdivision that immediately support the residence in the form of essential services. To learn more about this case and how it will further enable community association and construction defect lawyers in Florida to protect consumers who rely on the expertise of the developer for the proper construction of their new home, click here to read the full post.